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Modern Research: Faster Is Different

Faster is different. It sounds strange at first because we expect faster to be better. We expect faster to be more. If we can analyze data faster, we can analyze more data. If we can network faster, we can network with more people. Faster is more, which is better, but more is different.

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How to Tell an Interesting Data Story

The Laffer Curve. Anyone know what this says? It says that at this point on the revenue curve, you will get exactly the same amount of revenue as at this point. This is very controversial. Does anyone know what Vice President Bush called this in 1980? Anyone? …Bueller?... Bueller?... Bueller?

Data stories, believe it or not, can be gripping. You worked on the project because there was some urgency to it. The story is interesting because of that urgency and how you dealt with it.

In prior posts on communicating about data, I’ve introduced what it means to use ‘story’ to connect with your audience and how to structure a post to catch a non-captive audience's attention. In this post, learn what kind of content makes a data story a pleasure to experience.

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Communicating Data Science: How to Captivate a Noncaptive Audience

When communicating about your latest data science project, whether verbally or in writing, your audience often needs to know the takeaway right away, or you’ll lose their attention. This is especially the case if your audience includes colleagues, conference attendees, or readers from outside your field. In an earlier post on communicating data science, I dove into how the elements of story can hold your audience’s attention through a dense presentation. This post introduces (and applies) some tried and true approaches for introducing the end of your story at the beginning. You’ll capture the attention of those for whom your point is valuable and have their attention for your story, and the rest of the audience doesn’t matter.

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Communicating Data Science with 'Story'

Getting your audience’s attention, keeping it, and persuading listeners of your point are all hard to do in a world where most listeners start out thinking, and feeling, “I’ve got my own scheisse to do.” John Weathington’s recent post in Tech Republic, “Be the Hemingway of Data Science Storytelling,” makes the point that presenting data, which can be dry, is more effective if it incorporates elements of story – a protagonist, a journey with challenges, and a conclusion. Jeff Leek’s “The Elements of Data Analytic Style” has a chapter about presenting data that emphasizes story as the method for communicating results.

Great points. Essential.

But how literally should “story” be taken? Story, often romanticized as an abstract concept by omitting an article in front of it, can be an enchanting idea.

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