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A Data Exploration Journey with Cars and Parallel Coordinates

Parallel coordinates is one way to visually compare many variables at once and to see the correlations between them. Each variable is given a vertical axis, and the axes are placed parallel to each other. A line representing a particular sample is drawn between the axes, indicating how the sample compares across the variables.

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Use a Network Diagram to Uncover Relationships in Your Data

Often times, when we're looking at a mass of data, we're trying to get a sense for relationships within that data. Who is the leader in this social group? What is a common thread between different groups of people? Such relationships can be represented hundreds of ways graphically, but few are as powerful as the classic network diagram.

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Finding Netflix's Hidden Trove of Original Content with a Basic Network Diagram

Nexflix has collected an impressive amount of data on Hollywood entertainment, made possible by tracking the viewing habits of its more-than 90 million members. In 2013, Netflix took an educated guess based on that data to stream its own original series, risking its reputation and finances in the process. When people were subscribing to Netflix to watch a trove of television series and movies created by well-established networks and studios, why create original content? Now, few would question the move.

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What is a Data Application?

There are data visualizations. There are web applications. If they had a baby, you'd get a data application.

Data applications are a big part of where our data-driven world is headed. They're how data science gets operationalized. They are how end-users - whether they're subject matter experts, business decision makers, or consumers - interact with data, big and small. We all use a data application when we book a flight, for instance. 

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Alleviating Uncertainty in Bayesian Inference with MCMC sampling and Metropolis-Hastings

Bayesian inference is a statistical method used to update a prior belief based on new evidence, an extremely useful technique with innumerable applications. Uncertainty about probabilities that are hard to quantify is one of the challenges of Bayesian inference, but there is a solution that is exciting for its cross-disciplinary origins and the elegant chain of ideas of which it is composed.

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When Earth is Like an Egg: 3D Terrain Visualization

Some of the most satisfying breakthroughs happen when technology gets used in a way it was never intended. While working with our graphic design group at Sasaki on ways to generate a dot pattern for a decorative screen, we came across some open-source software called StippleGen. Stippling is a way of creating an image by means of dots. StippleGen was created to optimize stippling for, among other things, egg painting. The software does a great job of laying out dots with greater density on the darker areas of the image while keeping a comfortable spacing between the dots. What's more, the voronoi algorithm it uses gives an irregular, organic pattern. The ah-ha moment came when I realized this could be applied to a different problem, visualizing terrain; specifically, optimizing terrain meshes in 3D software based off elevation data (a.k.a. Digital Elevation Model (DEM)).

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A Data Application to Foretell the Next Silicon Valley?

Can we predict what the next hub of tech entrepreneurship will be? Could we pinpoint where the next real estate boom will be and invest there? Thanks to advances in machine learning and easier access to public data through Open Data initiatives, we can now explore these types of questions.

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Finding Abstractions that Give Data Applications 'Flight'

Continuing with our recent theme of abstraction in data applications, Dave King gave a talk last month explaining his design principles for "Making Code Sing: Finding the Right Abstractions." Nailing the best abstractions is a quintessential software challenge. We strive for generality, flexibility, and reuse, but we are often forced to compromise in order to get the details right for one particular use case. We end up with projects that we know have amazing potential for use in other applications but are too hardcoded to make repurposing easy. It’s frustrating to see the possibilities locked away, just out of reach.

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Epiphanies on Abstraction, Modularity, and Being Combinatorial

Six months ago I didn't understand the concept of abstraction. Now it comes up almost daily. It’s foundational to my thinking on everything from software to entrepreneurship. I can’t believe how simple it seems. When I finally grokked abstraction, it felt like my first taste of basic economics. Given a new framework, something that had always been there, intuited but blurry, came into focus.

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A Novice Coder, a Finance Data Application, and the Value of Rapid Prototyping

I like to build things. I like analysis. I like programming. Interestingly, you often need to reverse that order before you’re in a position to build an application for analyzing something. You need programming knowledge to turn the analysis into a “thing.” The problem is, while I like programming, I’m still new to it. I mean, I’m Codecademy good, but that doesn’t translate into a user facing application leveraging Python, Javascript, and D3. So, when I recently sat down to build a minimally viable data application for looking at airline stocks, I wondered how long it might take to get to viable and, frankly, feared how minimal it might be.

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